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Showing posts with label MIRCI. Show all posts
Showing posts with label MIRCI. Show all posts

20 February 2012

CFP: Performing Motherhood


CALL FOR PAPERS
Demeter Press
is seeking submissions for an edited collection
Performing Motherhood
Co-editors: Amber Kinser, Kryn Freehling-Burton and Terri Hawkes
Submission Deadline For Abstracts: June 15, 2012

Scholarly and lay observers alike have long recognized the relationship between everyday life and performance. Some hold to a sharp split between that which is authentic, true, or real, on one hand, and that which is contrivance, fa?ade, or "mere" performance on the other. Others indicate that any lines separating "performance" from "life" are indistinguishable or not useful, that all of life is performance, that human interaction of any sort is a text to be read in a variety of ways, that social meaning and identity are in fact performatively constituted.

Judith Butler and others have directed attention to performativity and the way it can contest and disrupt accepted meanings, truths, and values. In the performing arts, artists have questioned, theorized, embodied, represented, and troubled social meanings and subjectivities, and have deployed performance in the service of resistance and change. Performance ethnographers and biographical/autobiographical researcher-performers have explored performance dimensions of identity, culture, ritual, and ceremony, as well as the ways in which research findings can be represented through performance, taking research beyond traditional scholarly venues to reach lay audiences and shed prismatic light for academic audiences.

Performing Motherhood places these ideas center stage in maternal studies. 

In exploring the relationship between performance and the maternal, contributions to this anthology will pay particular attention to how mothers effectively exercise agency in personal and/or familial identity, and/or to how particular performances can affirm or activate maternal choices, grounded as they are in given social locations.

We seek the following in particular: 1) essays that are empirically and theoretically grounded that explore/complicate everyday life performances of the maternal; 2) creative performance texts that explore maternal agency; and 3) theoretical or research-based examinations of broad scale maternal performance, from community or global activism to the 'performing arts'.

Questions to consider include but are not limited to:
  • How do women and families enact/perform mothering in ways inconsistent with widely accepted norms (whether general social norms or assumed "feminist" or "progressive" norms) and how do they make that work for them, personally and socially?
  • How is maternal identity performatively constituted for the multiplicity of ways that people mother beyond biological ties?
  • What are some of the micropractices/performances that mothers engage in, or orchestrate in their families, that allow them to live self-determined lives? How does mundane practice/performance complicate and shape individual, familial, and social meaning.
  • In what ways do particular ritual or theatrical or activist performances suggest or embody affirmations of motherwork, maternal agency, or marginalized maternal voices, and what might these performances teach broader audiences?
  • How do performing arts practitioners who are also mothers negotiate multiple identities?
Submission Guidelines 
Abstracts should be about 300 words, and should identify the theoretical grounding for the essay or piece. Please also include a brief biography (50 words) and identify citizenship. 
Complete manuscripts not exceeding 15 pages (3750 words) will be due March 1st, 2013 and should be formatted according to MLA guidelines.

Editor responses will go out early summer of 2013 with final revisions due early fall.
The book is to have 50 percent Canadian content, so Canadian 
contributors are especially encouraged to submit.

Send abstracts to: kinsera@etsu.edu
Acceptance is contingent and will depend upon strength and fit of the final essay or piece.
Demeter Press
140 Holland St. West, PO 13022
Bradford, ON L3Z 2Y5 Tel: (905) 775-9089

Disclosure: I am getting a complementary membership to MIRCI and subscription to the journal in return for posting these updates. It is, however, something I would have agreed to do for free because I think their work is so wonderful.

13 February 2012

CFP: Matroreform and Motherlines Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS 
Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement  (MIRCI) 
MATROREFORM AND MOTHERLINES

October 18-20, 2013, Toronto, ON, Canada

Matroreform, a feminist term coined by Canadian psychologist Dr. Gina Wong, is a psychological, spiritual, cognitive, and emotional reformation of mothering at an intra- and interpersonal level; is a process by which mothers reproduce a new way of mothering apart from her motherline; and it represents an holistic, sociocultural revolution of motherhood at a global level. As a transformative maternal practice of claiming motherhood power, this progressive movement to mothering includes new and empowering motherhood ethos, ideologies, rules, views, and practices apart from one's motherline and apart from dominant and normative discourses of the sacrificial and good mother. Adrienne Rich describes matrophobia as the result of a daughterhood fraught with witnessing the self-sacrificing, capitulating, and self-denial of the mother who is trapped in the oppressive bonds of conventional motherhood. These daughters attempt to extricate themselves from anything remotely close to their mother, which often includes a fear of becoming mothers themselves. Instead, through a process of matroreform, these daughters become mothers and instigate mothering practices and ideas that are right for them; thereby entering new possibilities of what it means to mother. Motherlines: Award-winning poet, author, and Jungian analyst Naomi Ruth Lowinsky notes that our mothers are the first world we know, the source of our lives and stories, and embody the mysteries of origin that tie us to the great web of kin and generation. Motherlines acknowledge the embodied experiences and knowledge/s of mother/child relationships and the responsibilities, challenges, and labour involved in motherwork.Motherline stories contain invaluable lessons and memories of mothering, as well as support for mothers.

This conference will examine the experiences and counter-experiences of matroreform and motherlines that are enduring, severed, or threadbare. We will explore the feminist, political, social/cultural, economic, historical, religious, spiritual, and psychological dimensions of these topics. We welcome submissions from scholars, academics, students, artists, mothers, daughters, and others with experience and knowledge in the areas of matroreform and motherlines. Narratives of experiences as well as cross-cultural and comparative works are encouraged. We also encourage a variety of submissions including scholarly papers from all disciplines, creative submissions, and reflective pieces such as poetry, narratives, artwork, and performance art. 

Topics may include but are not restricted to:
Mothering daughters, daughtering, motherhood and oppression, sacrificial mothering, the 'good' mother, empowered mothering, feminist mothering, queer and transgendered mothering, academic mothering, historical accounts, narratives of different mothering; disordered eating, self-esteem and confidence issues, sexual-interference; reproducing mothering, enacting mothering in bold ways, interplay of religion and economic impact of matroreform; attachment, adopting and fostering impact on motherlines, research methods to study matroreform and motherlines, mothering bodies, embodiment, and material site of maternal power and oppression; cross-cultural perspectives and experiences of matroreform/motherlines, bi-cultural identity and motherlines; social media and technology influence on matroreform; mothering in the Information Age; mothering over 40; sexual interference; gender socialization; sociocultural influences; interdisciplinary perspectives on matroreform and motherlines; matroreform and mental health, depression and postpartum depression (debate intergenerational and motherline transmission), medicalization and pathologizing mother's distress; contextualizing mother's suffering; patriarchy and male-based assumptions of women's experiences; mother-blame; counselling strategies and approaches in working to strengthen motherlines and matroreform; ways to counter mainstream ethos of mothering and motherhood. 

Keynote Speakers TBA

If you are interested in being considered as a presenter, please send a 
250 word abstract and a 50-word bio by March 15th, 2013 to 



Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI)
140 Holland St. West, PO Box 13022
Bradford, ON, L3Z 2Y5 (tel) 905-775-5215

Disclosure: I am getting a complementary membership to MIRCI and subscription to the journal in return for posting these updates. It is, however, something I would have agreed to do for free because I think their work is so wonderful.

06 February 2012

CFP: Criminalized Mothers: Criminalizing Motherhood

CALL FOR PAPERS
Demeter Press
is seeking submissions for an edited collection
Criminalized Mothers: Criminalizing Motherhood
Co-editors: Joanne Minaker and Bryan Hogeveen  
Submission Deadline for Abstracts:June 1, 2012 
Alongside the dissemination of toxic neoliberal policies that benefit the richest segments of society, the conditions in which criminalized women mother have eroded. While the affluent savor the fruits of investment into new markets and unfettered movement of capital around the globe, the poor and marginalized find themselves subject to increasing levels of surveillance and social control strategies intended to monitor their movements and intrusively govern their conduct. In the same instant, residues of the welfare state that initially undergirded the well-being of the impoverished and marginalized crumble under the weight of a state that appears unwilling to offer any meaningful assistance. In this ethos of gross income disparities and the vilification of the most marginalized segments of society the criminal justice state manages the excess and punishes the impoverished. Males continue to constitute the vast majority of individuals dealt with by the criminal justice state. Women, especially poor and racialized females, are nevertheless the fastest growing prison population worldwide. Whether through prison, house arrest, probation or restorative justice many marginalized women and girls find themselves subjected to state sponsored controls. Many of these women and girls are mothers. We collectively know very little about the conditions and contexts under which these women care for their children. This collection examines the challenges, difficulties and successes of criminalized mothers. It will highlight innovative programs and enterprising projects that seek to carve out welcome and hospitable spaces for these women. In particular, it seeks to give a voice to marginalized women who are too often silent and silenced by systems of control. The editors seek article length contributions from scholars and practitioners from all disciplines, including (but not limited to) criminology, sociology, social legal studies, education, political science, philosophy, criminal justice studies, geography and anthropology. We are equally interested in auto-ethnographic accounts that detail the frustrations and triumphs of mothers who have experienced criminal justice interventions. Artwork, poetry and short stories are also welcome.    

Articles may examine (but are not limited to) the following topics:
Probation and mothering; mothering on house arrest; restorative justice and motherhood; mothering in the context of domestic violence; prison mother/child programs; mothering while incarcerated; criminal justice policies and motherhood; the criminalization of poverty and motherhood; addictions and mothering; mothering sex workers; criminalized girls and mothering; programs for young female offenders and their children; motherhood and risk; surveillance and mothering; ethnography; mothering on parole; racialized mothers; child welfare; foster mothering; immigrant mothers; tensions between rights and needs of children and mothers.
Submission Guidelines

Please submit 250 word abstracts and a 50 word biography and citizenship.
Deadline for abstracts: June 1, 2012. Completed chapters are due June 1, 2013
Please send submissions and inquiries directly to Joanne Minaker 
(minakerj@macewan.ca) and Bryan Hogeveen (hogeveen@ualberta.ca

Disclosure: I am getting a complementary membership to MIRCI and subscription to the journal in return for posting these updates. It is, however, something I would have agreed to do for free because I think their work is so wonderful.

16 January 2012

CFP: Stay at Home Mothers: An International Perspective


CALL FOR PAPERS
Demeter Press is seeking submissions for an edited collection
Stay at Home Mothers: An International Perspective
Editors: Elizabeth Reid Boyd and Gayle Letherby 
DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: June 1, 2012!  
Stay at home mothers and the 'mommy wars' are a continuing phenomenon worldwide. This book will be the first international edited collection exploring debates and issues surrounding mothers returning to/staying at home from a variety of countries and perspectives.

Stay-at home mothering remains a significant social and gender trend. Over the last decades, there have been many books exploring questions, issues and policies surrounding working mothers. This volume explores the flip side to enable a new discussion: Why are mothers still staying at home? Which mothers? In which countries? Under what conditions? What kind of rhetoric is invoked - personal choice or political push? Which national policies benefit them? Which don't? What debates - and emotions - do they provoke?

Chapters can be written from a national perspective and can include both empirical data on mothers staying at home, including statistical trends, as well as conceptual discussion and analysis. This will enable comparison; it will also provide scope for contrasting views. The book will not be for or against stay at home mothers, though it will include debates around the topic, and, indeed, is likely to provoke them.

Topics can also include (but are not limited to):     
Debates about the 'worthiness' of different mothers staying at home such as government funded teen mothers versus wealthy, older 'yummy mummies'; the 'mommy wars' between working moms and stay at home moms; maternal versus paid child care; the persistence of mothering at home and what it means; the take up of maternal (and paternal) leave; maternity payments and childcare policy; state enabling of mothers staying at home; the 'new Victorians'/the domestic goddess and the increasing idealisation of mothers at home; the leisured mother at home assisted by a (foreign worker) maid; stay at home mothers and the media; the history of mothers staying at home; generational change and visions for the future. Different viewpoints, from academics to lobby groups, are welcomed.
Submission Guidelines
Abstracts: 250 words. Please include a 50-word biography (with citizenship information.)
Deadline for abstracts is June 1, 2012
Please send submissions and inquiries directly to:
Elizabeth Reid Boyd e.boyd@ecu.edu.au

Accepted papers of 4000-5000 words (15-20 pages) will be due between April to June 2013, and should conform to American Anthropological Association style.

Disclosure: I am getting a complementary membership to MIRCI and subscription to the journal in return for posting these updates. It is, however, something I would have agreed to do for free because I think their work is so wonderful.

02 January 2012

CFP: Mothers, Education, Maternal Pedagogies and Motherhood Studies


CALL FOR PAPERS

The editorial board is seeking submissions for Vol. 4.1 of the Journal of the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (JMI) to be published in spring/summer 2013.

Mothering, Education, Maternal Pedagogies and Motherhood Studies

The journal will explore the topic of Mothering, Education, Maternal Pedagogies and Motherhood Studies from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. We welcome submissions from scholars, students, activists, government agencies and workers, artists, mothers, and others who work or research in this area. Cross- cultural, historical and comparative work is encouraged. We also welcome creative reflections such as poetry, short stories, and artwork on the subject.


Topics can include (but are not limited to):

Normative & disruptive discourses about motherhood and education; pedagogical othermothering & midwifery; mothering in the academy; teaching & learning from mothers at the margins (mothers of color, teen mothers, First Nation/aboriginal/Native American mothers, low-income mothers; adoptive mothers, queer and transgendered mothers...); maternal pedagogies; empowered mothering & teaching; mothering, education, & disability; education & infertility; men, mothering, & education; mothering & homeschooling; mothering, education, & activism; education & the public/private split; mothers' historical experiences of education; teaching one's actual or surrogate children; navigating cultural expressions of "good" and "bad" mother/ing; second/third shift responsibilities & education; transmitting maternal knowledges; motherhood & online teaching; problematizing the motherly teacher; literary/artistic/pop cultural representations of motherhood & education; teaching and/or learning parenting skills; educating public policy makers about mothering/motherhood; challenges to patriarchal and/or imperialist educational ideologies and practices; motherhood, education,& health; feminist motherlines & education; teaching/learning about mothering/motherhood through new media ; Is a distinct scholarly discipline of Motherhood Studies needed or necessary? What are the benefits and risks of creating a distinct discipline? How do we determine what is Motherhood Studies and what is not? Is such determined by the content and or perspective of the scholarship? Are there methodologies and or pedagogies distinct to Motherhood Studies; what are they? What topics have been well-researched? What areas require further study and research? What are the strengths of Canadian Motherhood Studies? What is the hertory of Motherhood Studies in Canada? Have some regions and universities been more prominent (and why)? What is the relationship of Motherhood Studies to Women's Studies, Childhood Studies, and Feminist Studies? Is Motherhood Studies feminist in its perspective and content? Does it have to be? How does Motherhood Studies relate to the burgeoning studies of fatherhood/parenthood? How do we study motherhood without falling prey to the scholarly limitations of 'identity politics' and essentialism? How do we best develop and disseminate Canadian motherhood studies?


SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

Articles should be 15-18 pages (3750 words) including references. All should be in MLA style, WordPerfect or Word and IBM compatible. Please see our style guide for complete details: http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org/journalsubmission.html

SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY NOVEMBER 1, 2012! ** TO SUBMIT WORK ONE MUST BE A MEMBER OF MIRCI

http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org/membership.html


Please direct your submissions to: Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI) 140 Holland St. West, PO Box 13022 Bradford, ON, L3Z 2Y5 (905) 775-9089 http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org info@motherhoodinitiative.org

Disclosure: I am getting a complementary membership to MIRCI and subscription to the journal in return for posting these updates. It is, however, something I would have agreed to do for free because I think their work is so wonderful.

05 December 2011

JOURNAL CFP: Motherhood and Activism

CALL FOR PAPERS
The editorial board is seeking submissions for Vol. 3.2 of the Journal of the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (JMI) to be published in fall/winter 2012.
Motherhood Activism, Advocacy, Agency

The journal will explore the topic of Motherhood Activism, Advocacy and Agency from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. We welcome submissions from scholars, students, activists, government agencies and workers, artists, mothers, and others who work or research in this area. Cross-cultural, historical and comparative work is encouraged. We also welcome creative reflections such as poetry, short stories, and artwork on the subject.

Topics can include (but are not limited to):
the relationship between maternal agency and institutional constraints; personal agency; social agency; intersectionality and maternal agency; maternal agency and social justice; empowerment and family-life responsibilities; maternal agency and legal norms/practices; public policy and the public/private split; neoliberalism and public policy for mothers; healthism and maternal agency; navigating cultural expressions of "good" and "bad" mothering; second and third shift responsibility and agency; online advocacy and empowered mothering; maternal advocacy as theorized or practiced by women of a particular race, class, religion, or culture; empowered caregiving versus non-empowered caregiving; workplace norms and maternal advocacy or agency; motherhood and politics; "having it all" and maternal empowerment; challenging the maternal wall; challenging the "price of motherhood"; pregnancy and maternal agency; empowered mothering and disability; co-parenting and maternal empowerment; social change potential of memoir, narrative, autobiography, or blogging; maternal empowerment through artistic expression, film, music, literature, pop culture, or other arts; maternal agency through 'experts' or resistance to them; maternal empowerment by being resistant to or rooted in traditions, histories, or generational knowledges; navigating multiple identities as a mother; motherhood movements; advocacy for new family forms and relations; feminist mothering; queer and/or transgendered mothering; gender equity in home and work place; redefining fathering; othermothering; activism by young and/or low-income mothers; maternal activists' allies.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Articles should be 15-18 pages (3750 words) including references. All should be in MLA style, WordPerfect or Word and IBM compatible. Please see our style guide for complete details: http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org/journalsubmission.html


SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY MAY 1, 2012! 
** TO SUBMIT WORK ONE MUST BE A MEMBER OF MIRCI

Please direct your submissions to:
Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI) 140 Holland St. West, PO Box 13022 Bradford, ON, L3Z 2Y5 (905) 775-9089 http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org info@motherhoodinitiative.org

Disclosure: I am getting a complementary membership to MIRCI and subscription to the journal in return for posting these updates. It is, however, something I would have agreed to do for free because I think their work is so wonderful.

23 November 2011

THREE New CFP's from Demeter Press (Disabled Mothers, Black Mothers and Gender in Mothering)

Get your typing fingers ready because here are three new Calls for Papers from Demeter Press! All three are for edited collections.

CFPs are listed in order of abstract deadlines. So grab your calendar and thinking hat.




1) Disabled Mothers*

Co-Editors: Gloria Filax and Dena Taylor

Publication Date: 2014

While there are several books on raising children with disabilities, the literature is scant on experiences of disabled women who are raising children OR the experiences of those parented by a woman with disabilities. Bringing together disability with mothering has the potential to challenge dominant narratives of both mothering AND disability. Noticing dominant ideas, meanings, and/or stories/narratives (normative discourses) regarding both 'mothering' and 'disability' expose the limits beyond which disabled mothers live their daily lives.

The goal of this edited collection is to add to literatures on mothering and disability through providing stories by disabled mothers or their children as well as chapters of scholarly research and theorizing. We intend that both stories and research in this collection will raise critical questions about the social and cultural meanings of disability and mothering. Whether a birth mother, an adoptive mother, a foster mother, a co-mother, someone mothered by a disabled woman, or someone whose research explores disabled mothering, we invite you to submit to this collection.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:


How are disabled women discouraged from having children? How does the medical model of disability shape the meanings assigned to disabled mothers? How do chronic illnesses affect mothering? Are disabled mothers healthy mothers? How do the social and cultural models of disability shape how we understand disabled mothers and mothering? Are disabled mothers oppressed? How do issues of race, class, and sexuality affect disabled mothers and their families? Should disabled mothers 'pass' as normal? How are pregnancy and birth experiences shaped by disability? How do children experience and understand a disabled mother? What support is needed and received by disabled mothers? How does the built environment, both public and private, shape the experiences of disabled mothers? What kinds of issues are there with children's schools, health professionals and/or children's attitudes? What form, if any, does social and political activism take? Do legal remedies work to assist disabled mothers (for example, disability as a protected category in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms or the Americans with Disabilities Act)? How does a mother's disability expose the expectations of mothering? How does a mother's disability expose the assumptions about disability? How is society disabling of mothering? How can we 'do' disabled mothering differently?

Submission Guidelines

Abstracts should be 250 words. Please also include a brief biography (50 words) with citizenship. Please send to gfilax@shaw.ca and detaylor@cabrillo.edu

Deadline for Abstracts is December 31, 2011

Accepted papers of 4000-5000 words (15-20 pages) will be due October 15, 2012 and should conform to MLA citation format.

*Tanya Titchkosky argues that referring to "disabled people" is preferable because it emphasizes disablement as a social process that prevents certain people from access to resources and goods available to others. "People with disabilities" implies that disability is not part of what it is to be a person and leaves disability as a problem. We agree with Titchkosky and therefore our choice of the title for this collection is "Disabled Mothers". (See Tanya Titchkosky (2003) Disability, Self, and Society. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, chapter 2).

2) Chasing Rainbows:
Exploring Gender Fluid Mothering Practices


Co-Editors: Fiona Green and May Friedman

Publication Date: Early 2014

Feminist mothering creates unique challenges. Mothers may struggle with shifts in their own subjectivity and the peculiar conjoinment of parenthood. As women experience the unique powerlessness of motherhood, they also hold the uncomfortable power of acting as agents of socialization and social control over their children. While this power is evident in many areas of parenting, it is especially keenly experienced in the area of gender and mothering.

Feminist mothers may attempt to resist gender binaries; they may submit to them while attempting to foster critical dialogue; they may struggle with the display of their own femininity or, for some, its perceived lack. For some parents a dialogue about gender normativity may be inspired by gender-diverse behavior on the part of their own children, while others may parent children who happily submit to the mainstream and query the need for gender questioning. Chasing Rainbows: Exploring Gender Fluid Mothering Practices attempts to cast a lens on the messy and convoluted ways that feminist parents approach parenting their children in gender aware and gender fluid ways. The collection aims to draw together scholars, activists and community members to open a conversation about the challenges of exploring and maintaining an awareness of gender while parenting in a highly gender normative world. Because gender is expressed and performed differently in various places and spaces, and across different ages, this collection welcomes submissions from feminist parents and from the widest range of experiences.

Suggested topics may include, but are not limited to:

Cross-cultural, historical, transnational, comparative and interdisciplinary modes of inquiry and analysis
Gender fluid parenting within and beyond cisgendered mother and father parenting roles
The challenges and gifts of affective/psychic/embodied transformations of gender fluid parenting
Media representations and spectacles of gender fluid/diverse/variant families
Alternative visual and artistic depictions of gender variant socialization in/of family life
Racialization of gender variant parenting/family discourses
Gender diverse self-help parenting texts
Community based gender variant/diverse/fluid family activism and organizing
Commodification of gender fluid mothering and gender variant families
Practical and theoretical ways of complicating and shaping fluid gender expression
Broad social and historical forces that impact what can be done and said in the name of gender diverse families

Submission Guidelines

Abstracts should be 250 words. Please also include a brief biography (50 words) with citizenship.

Please send to: may.friedman@ryerson.ca, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria St.,
Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 and f.green@uwinnipeg.ca, University of Winnipeg,
515 Portage Ave., Winnipeg, MB R3T 1M5.

Deadline for Abstracts is March 15, 2012 & Deadline for Acceptances is May 15, 2012.

Accepted papers not exceeding 15 pages (3750 words) will be due February 15, 2013

and should be formatted according to MLA guidelines. The book is to have 50 percent
Canadian content, so Canadian contributors are especially encouraged to submit.


3) Patricia Hill Collins: Reconceiving Black Motherhood
Editor: Kaila Adia Story

Publication Date: 2014

In 1965 a then sociologist and eventual US senator, Daniel Patrick Moynihan released his report, The Negro Family: The Case for National Action. The report concluded that the Black family existed as a tangle of pathology, which struggled to make progress toward economic and political equality due to its deterioration of the concept of the nuclear family. Since the release of the report forty-six years ago, many Black feminists and motherhood scholars have elucidated the ways in which Moynihan's conception of the Black family, in particular the Black mother, was couched in racist, classist, and sexist notions of the family and the institution of motherhood. One such Black Feminist scholar was Patricia Hill Collins. In the spirit of Demeter Press and the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI), this anthology seeks to discuss the impact/influence/ and/or importance of Patricia Hill Collins on motherhood research. The goal of this edited collection is to add to the existing literature on Black Motherhood and the Black Family. In addition, this collection will raise critical questions about the social and cultural meanings of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and mothering.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

How has Hill Collins' work disrupted or undone previous work about motherhood? How has Hill Collins' work paved the way to understanding the institution of Black motherhood? How has Hill Collins discussed conceptions of Motherhood and agency in her work? What has Hill Collins' work done to reconceptualize our ideas of Black mothers and fathers? Which aspect of Hill Collins' work speaks to sexuality and conceptions of parenting? How can we unpack Hill Collins' conception of "real mothers"? How does Hill Collins' notion of the "new racism" relate to the institution of mothering? What does Hill Collins' work do to move conversations of national identity and race forward? How has Hill Collins' work allowed other motherhood scholars to rewrite the constellation of motherhood?

Submission Guidelines:

Please submit abstracts of 250 words and include your 50 word bio and citizenship

Deadline for Abstracts is April 1, 2012

Please send submissions and inquiries directly to:

Kaila Adia Story: doctressstory@gmail.com

Disclosure: I am getting a complementary membership to MIRCI and subscription to the journal in return for posting these updates. It is, however, something I would have agreed to do for free because I think their work is so wonderful.

16 November 2011

NEW CONFERENCE CFP: Mothering and Reproduction


CALL FOR PAPERS
Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI)
MOTHERING AND REPRODUCTION

featuring an embedded conference on the topic of
MOTHERING, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY

October 18-20, 2012, Toronto, ON, Canada

We welcome submissions from scholars, students, artists, mothers and others who research in this area.
Cross-cultural and comparative work is encouraged. We are open to a variety of submissions including
academic papers from all disciplines and creative submissions including visual art, literature, and performance art.

This conference will examine the ethical, political, social/cultural, economic, historical, religious, spiritual, and psychological dimensions of reproduction and mothering. While the larger conference will be broad in its interpretation and engagement with the subject of 'Mothering and Reproduction', an embedded conference will be specific to exploring how mothers' decisions and experiences of reproduction and mothering have been/are influenced by science and technology. This Call For Papers is for both the larger conference, and the embedded one. Please feel free to submit to either, without necessarily specifying which you have in mind for your abstract/presentation.

Topics may include but are not restricted to:
Bioethics and fertility; abortion, birth control and assisted fertility in a cross cultural context; reproductive
technologies and the interplay of religion; mothering in families of high order multiple births; mothering on the
blogosphere; queer engagements with reproduction; motherhood and the technological womb; modern childbirth and maternity care; (mis)educative experiences teaching and learning about menstruation and reproduction; re/productive roles mothers play in de/constructing embodied understandings of reproduction; surviving tramautic birth experiences; mothers in academe/research; mothering and the workplace, how technology permeates the work/home barrier; attachment with adopted and biological children; birth plans; how science and technology inform social justice issues; assisted reproductive technologies, state policy, and federalism's impacts on women in the United States and around the world; reproductive decisions and a politics of location; impact of social media on opinions regarding reproduction; "mothering" from a distance; the experience of egg donation; mothers' changing relationship with "the experts" regarding birthing, infant care in the age of infectious diseases, baby books and birth control; reproductive rights and wrongs, including rise of contraceptive technology alongside state-coerced sterilization; mothering in the Information Age; maternalist political rhetoric in favor of labor rights; mothering bodies; pre and postnatal bodies and reconstructive surgery; eating disorders and reproduction; reproductive consciousness and politics of reproduction; outcomes associated with scientific/technological intervention; outsourcing of reproduction to developing nations; maternal and erotic/maternal eroticism; history of reproductive technologies; Indigenous mothers and mothering; cross-cultural perspectives on reproduction including reproductive technologies.

Keynote Speakers TBA
If you are interested in being considered as a presenter, please send a 250 word abstract and a 50-word
bio by March 15th, 2011 to info@motherhoodinitiative.org

** TO SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT FOR THIS CONFERENCE,
ONE MUST BE A MEMBER OF MIRCI

http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org/membership.html
Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI)
140 Holland St. West, PO Box 13022, Bradford, ON, L3Z 2Y5 (905) 775-9089
http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org info@motherhoodinitiative.org

Disclosure: I am getting a complementary membership to MIRCI and subscription to the journal in return for posting these updates. It is, however, something I would have agreed to do for free because I think their work is so wonderful.

10 November 2011

CFP: Motherhood/Fatherhood and Popular Culture



Call For Papers: Motherhood/Fatherhood and Popular Culture

Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association (PCA/ACA)National Conference:
2012 Boston, Massachusetts, April 11- 14

Julie Tharp and Susan MacCallum-Whitcomb write in This Giving Birth: "Ever since a pregnant Demi Moore exploded the beauty myth by posing nude for a magazine cover and Madonna cast off her boy-toy image to sing the praises of maternity, popular culture has also begun to embrace dear old mom." At the same time, Modern Family, Mr. Mom, Thomas Beatie, the At-Home Dads Convention, and Superdad: a Memoir of Rebellion, Drugs and Fatherhood are just a few examples testifying to how popular culture has been embracing dad.

Liz Podnieks is looking for papers for multiple panels for the new PCA Area Motherhood/Fatherhood which showcases (from humanities and social sciences perspectives) any aspect of motherhood and or fatherhood in popular culture.

Possible topics to consider include, but are not limited to, the following:
-TV shows, including talk shows, family dramas, sitcoms, and animation
-print and electronic journalism and gossip rags; magazines
-celebrity culture
-electronic sites/technologies like blogs, Facebook, Twitter
-advertising and marketing
-visual art including photography, scrapbooking, mixed media
-film; performance; music
-graphic fiction/memoir
-best-selling literatures including mommy lit, momoirs, and dadlit
-pregnancy manuals and "expert" parenting guides/literature
-fashion
-politics
-reproductive technologies
-law and policy; maternal and paternal activism/organizations

For information on the PCA/ACA, please see: http://pcaaca.org/
Abstracts (200-250 words) will be accepted on a continuing basis up to December 15, 2011. Abstracts must be submitted online at: http://ncp.pcaaca.org/.

Please send any inquiries to the Area Chair:
Liz Podnieks, Associate Professor
Department of English and
Graduate Studies in Communication and Culture
Ryerson University, Toronto
lpodniek@ryerson.ca

05 October 2011

New Conference CFP: Mothering and Reproduction

CALL FOR PAPERS
Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI)

MOTHERING AND REPRODUCTION
featuring an embedded conference on the topic of
MOTHERING, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY

October 18-20, 2012, Toronto, ON, Canada

We welcome submissions from scholars, students, artists, mothers and others who research in this area. Cross-cultural and comparative work is encouraged. We are open to a variety of submissions including academic papers from all disciplines and creative submissions including visual art, literature, and performance art.

This conference will examine the ethical, political, social/cultural, economic, historical, religious, spiritual, and psychological dimensions of reproduction and mothering. While the larger conference will be broad in its interpretation and engagement with the subject of 'Mothering and Reproduction', an embedded conference will be specific to exploring how mothers' decisions and experiences of reproduction and mothering have been/are influenced by science and technology. This Call For Papers is for both the larger conference, and the embedded one. Please feel free to submit to either, without necessarily specifying which you have in mind for your abstract/presentation.

Topics may include but are not restricted to:
Bioethics and fertility; abortion, birth control and assisted fertility in a cross cultural context; reproductive technologies and the interplay of religion; mothering in families of high order multiple births; mothering on the blogosphere; queer engagements with reproduction; motherhood and the technological womb; modern childbirth and maternity care; (mis)educative experiences teaching and learning about menstruation and reproduction; re/productive roles mothers play in de/constructing embodied understandings of reproduction; surviving tramautic birth experiences; mothers in academe/research; mothering and the workplace, how technology permeates the work/home barrier; attachment with adopted and biological children; birth plans; how science and technology inform social justice issues; assisted reproductive technologies, state policy, and federalism's impacts on women in the United States and around the world; reproductive decisions and a politics of location; impact of social media on opinions regarding reproduction; "mothering" from a distance; the experience of egg donation; mothers' changing relationship with "the experts" regarding birthing, infant care in the age of infectious diseases, baby books and birth control; reproductive rights and wrongs, including rise of contraceptive technology alongside state-coerced sterilization; mothering in the Information Age; maternalist political rhetoric in favor of labor rights; mothering bodies; pre and postnatal bodies and reconstructive surgery; eating disorders and reproduction; reproductive consciousness and politics of reproduction; outcomes associated with scientific/technological intervention; outsourcing of reproduction to developing nations; maternal and erotic/maternal eroticism; history of reproductive technologies; Indigenous mothers and mothering; cross-cultural perspectives on reproduction including reproductive technologies.

Keynote Speakers TBA

If you are interested in being considered as a presenter, please send a 250 word abstract and a 50-word bio by March 15th, 2011 to info@motherhoodinitiative.org

** TO SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT FOR THIS CONFERENCE, ONE MUST BE A MEMBER OF MIRCI : http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org/membership.html

12 September 2011

CFP: One Day Conference:: Motherhood; Creativity In Theory & Practice

CALL FOR PAPERS

One Day Conference   
Motherhood; Creativity In Theory & Practice

Museum Of Motherhood
Oct. 3, 2011
301 East 84th St. NYC (lower level), New York - USA

Museum of Motherhood logo  
Conference will focus on the concept of creativity through theory and practice within the experience and study of motherhood.  Conference presenters and participants will develop an understanding of the creative process and how this has impact upon their professional and mothering identities.

We welcome submissions from scholars, students, activists, artists, community agencies, service providers, journalists, mothers and others who work or research in this area. Cross-cultural, historical, and comparative work is encouraged. We encourage a variety of types of submissions including academic papers from all disciplines, workshops, creative submissions, performances, storytelling, visual arts, film, music, audio and other alternative formats.Topics include (but are not limited to):

Representing Maternal creativity in Film, Video, Art, Music, and Theater; Theorizing Motherhood and Representation; Race, Representation and Motherhood and mobilizing voices through creativity; Maternal Ambivalence in visual culture; Countering Media Discourses on Motherhood with Mother voices; Maternal Loss, Depression, and Domestic Violence; Performing Feminist Mothering in Practice and Expression; Mother Writer: Writing Motherhood; Facilitating the Creative Family; A Culture of Creative Children; Imaging LGBT Mothers and Maternity; "Late Bloomer" Art: Post-Maternal Mother Artists; Representing Motherhood on the Internet; The Politics of Motherhood and Spirituality in Music and Visual Culture; Motherhood, Art, and Creativity; Healing and Creativity; The Performance of the Maternal or Performing Motherhood; Mothering and Disability: Producing New Paradigms of Normal; Motherhood in the News: Mothers as Newsmaker and Creative Cultural Force; Documenting Motherhood: Maternal Documentaries; Mothers, Motherhood and Photography; Behind the Camera: Mothers as Filmmakers, Directors, Producers; Mother Musicians across Musical Genres: Rock, Rap, Folk, Blues, Jazz, Country Narratives of Creative Mothers: Moms who "Rock," Expressing: Imaging Breastfeeding Mothers, Mommy Bloggers: Re-Writing Motherhood, etc.; Dealing with (Post-partum) Depression by Making Creative Work; Pregnant moms; Celebrity mothers; How images of fathers impact motherhood representation; News media coverage of foster moms; Moms in politics; teen mothers in film or television; advertising as aimed at pregnant/new Moms; Mothers as consumers; Mothering and the representation of Class and Transformation Through Creative Empowerment.   

Please distribute widely! Museum of Motherhood One Day Conference CFP 

Questions: MOMmuseum.org l MuseumOfMotherhood@gmail.com l 877.711.MOMS (6667)
  
Submit proposals at http://www.mommuseum.org/apply/

07 September 2011

NEW! Seeking Editor(s) for Asian American/Canadian Mothering Collection

Demeter Press
is seeking an editor(s) for a new collection on the topic of
          ASIAN AMERICAN/CANADIAN MOTHERING

If you are interested in this opportunity, please email Andrea O'Reilly directly (aoreilly@yorku.ca).
AND please include your CV and bio/background/interest in this area.

*Please note: Demeter Press is publishing an edited collection entitled "South Asian Mothering" in 2012 so we are interested specifically in East Asian perspectives for the above named project.

03 September 2011

New CFP and three reminders: Caribbean Women's Writing, Mothering & Neoliberalism, Histories of Motherhood, Economics of Mothering

NEW: Call for Submissions

Demeter Press is seeking submissions for an edited collection entitled:

Reading/Speaking/Writing the Mother Text: Essays on

Caribbean Women's Writing

Co-editors: Cristina Herrera and Paula Sanmartín Publication Date: 2014


Deadline for abstracts: January 15, 2012!

Scholarly work on Caribbean women's literature has grown since the 1990's, and much of this research examines maternal themes, as the topic of motherhood is highly visible in written works by women of the Caribbean regions. While there are several book-length studies on Caribbean women's literature, and a limited number of them do focus on the subject of Caribbean mothers, many of these studies lack analyses of the Spanish Caribbean, and the subject of motherhood, when explored, is also presented in rather specific contexts. Therefore, this collection seeks to expand this previous scholarship by offering a more expansive view of motherhood that encompasses a wide variety of thematic concerns, as well as a broader geographical scope that places a stronger emphasis on the understudied (Afro)Spanish Caribbean writers. In addition, the collection will strive to recover and discover new (Afro)Caribbean voices, by including essays on writers whose works have received little or no critical attention. The editors seek article-length contributions in all areas of literature, including poetry, novels, short stories, drama, autobiography, and essays.


Articles may discuss (but are not limited to) the following topics:

*Comparative studies* Postcolonialism/Critical Race Studies* Afro-Caribbean women writers from the Spanish Caribbean, British Caribbean, French Caribbean, and the Dutch Caribbean* Matrilineal heritages and narratives* Maternal (her)stories* Maternal sexualities* Mothering and (im)migration, (im)migrant mothers and diaspora writing* Mother/daughter relationships* Grandmothers and "other mothers"* Mothering, home and the mother(land)* Maternal absence, maternal death* Abandonment, mother/daughter loss and gain* Madness, illness, the mad/ill mother and/or daughter* Maternal silences and mother tongues* Trauma, memory and mothering* Mothering and agency* Womanhood and motherhood* Revision and recovery of (m)other histories* Family narratives*Traditions of motherhood/mothering


Submission Guidelines:

Please submit abstracts of 250 words and include your 50 word bio and citizenship.

Deadline for Abstracts is January 15, 2012


Please send submissions and inquiries directly to Cristina Herrera and Paula Sanmartin: cherrera@csufresno.edu, psanmartin@csufresno.edu

REMINDER #1: CALL FOR PAPERS

Demeter Press is seeking submissions for an edited collection on Mothering in the Age of Neoliberalism

Editor: Melinda Vandenbeld Giles


DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: NOVEMBER 1, 2011!

The term "neoliberal" has come to define our current global age, yet definitive understandings of what "neoliberal" means remains a contested terrain. In the past three decades, neoliberal economic/social ideology has created a global world governed by free-market principles. The purpose of this edited collection is to explore the meanings and effects of neoliberalism from the perspective of "mothers." Arising from an inclusive and broad understanding of "mothering," the intent of the collection is to compile diverse works from an assortment of geographical areas and interests pertaining to mothering and neoliberalism. For the purposes of this volume, neoliberalism is to be understood as a social as well as political/economic ethos whereby the free-market focus has come to infiltrate all aspects of society. The collection will focus on ethnographic (research-based) and theoretical submissions.

Topics can include (but are not limited to):

Marginalized mothers, mothering and homelessness, mothering and the social welfare state, mothering and childcare, intensive mothering and neoliberalism, mothering and migration, transnational mothering, mothering and capitalism, mothering and maternity leave, mothering and employment, mothering and "working from home," mothering and individuation, mothering and neoliberal child-rearing practices, neoliberal representations of "mothering," single mothering, connections between neoliberalism, feminism and mothering, neoliberalism and re-conceptualizing the "nuclear family," eco-mothering, neoliberal policies and reproductive rights, mothering and the economy, mothering and collective political mobilization, mothering and finance, entrepreneurial mothers, mothering and neoliberal education, neoliberal reconfiguration of public/private dichotomy, mothering and neoliberal discourses of health, gender roles and neoliberalism, mothers as niche markets, mothering and urban living, neoliberal redefining of family/home spatialization, mothers and microcredit, mothering and poverty, mothering and media, mothering in the informal economy, mothering and governmentality, mothering and risk discourse, mothering and transnational spatiality, mothering and Marxism, mothering and NGOs, global neoliberal maternal health discourses, mothering and volunteerism, mothering and the global labour market, effects of privatization and decentralization on mothering, effects of neoliberal structural readjustment on mothering, neoliberalism and reconfigured kinship networks, mothering and globalization, neoliberalism and family law, mothering and social activism, mothering and alternative sustainable economic paradigms.

Submission guidelines:

Abstracts: 250 words. Please include a 50-word biography (with citizenship information.)


Deadline for abstracts is November 1, 2011


Please send submissions and inquiries directly to:

Melinda Vandenbeld Giles: melinda.vandenbeldgiles@utoronto.ca

Accepted papers of 4000-5000 words (15-20 pages) will be due July 1, 2012, and should conform to American Anthropological Association style.

REMINDER #2: CALL FOR PAPERS

Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI)


Mothers and History: Histories of Motherhood

May 10-12, 2012, Toronto, ON, Canada

Deadline for abstracts: September 15th, 2011

We welcome submissions from scholars, students, artists, mothers and others who research in this area. Cross-cultural and comparative work is encouraged. We are open to a variety of types of submissions including academic papers from all disciplines and creative submissions.

This conference will explore the nature, status and experience of mothers and motherhood in various historical, cultural and literary contexts, and examine the many ways in which mothers in different historical periods have been affected by, viewed, and/or challenged contemporary cultural norms and dominant ideologies regarding their role.

Topics may include but are not restricted to:

Normative & disruptive discourses about mothers and motherhood in any historical period, including but not limited to the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment; the Victorian era; mothers/motherhood and early feminism(s); mothering bodies: mothers and childbirth/lactation and maternal health in any historical period; mothers & midwifery; mothers and education in any historical period; mothers and sons/daughters in any historical period; mothers of color, teen mothers, First Nation/aboriginal/Native American mothers, low-income mothers in any historical period; "good" and/or "bad" mothers in history; mothers and paid/unpaid work in history; mothers and infertility in history; adoptive motherhood/adoption in any historical period; wet-nursing, and surrogate motherhood in any historical period; transmitting maternal knowledges, creative expression and motherhood; patriarchal mothers/motherhood; mothers/motherhood and oral histories/family histories; motherhood and colonialism; mothering encounters across cultures; othermothering; state(s)/ nationalism/religion(s), and motherhood; mother love: transhistorical and/or historically determined; representations of mothers/mothering in art, literature, narrative, popular culture throughout history; maternal feminisms/mother movements/maternal activism in history; mothers and politics across history; famous mothers in history; immigrant/migrant/transnational mothers in history; mothers' changing relationship with "the experts" regarding birthing, infant care in the age of infectious diseases, baby books, birth control and eugenic sterilization, infertility, etc.; reproductive rights and wrongs, including rise of contraceptive technology alongside state-coerced sterilization; momism and mother blame with the rise of psychology; mothers and the state, especially welfare rights and wrongs ; maternalist political rhetoric in favor of suffrage, labor rights ; rise of intensive mothering; queer/transgendered mothers/mothering in a historical perspective ; mothering queer/transgendered children in a historical perspective ; mothering in the Information Age ; maternal associations/mothers' groups.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Patrizia Albanese, Ryerson University, author of Child Poverty in Canada

Kim Anderson, University of Guelph, author of Recognition of Being: Reconstructing Native Womanhood

Rima D. Apple, University of Wisconsin, author of Perfect Motherhood: Science and Childrearing in America

Susan Boyd, University of British Columbia, co-author of Reaction and Resistance: Feminism, Law, and Social Change

Fiona J. Green, University of Winnipeg, author of Practicing Feminist Mothering

D. Memee Lavell-Harvard, President, Ontario Native Women's Association (ONWA) and

Jeannette Corbiere Lavell, President, Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC)

Lynn O'Brien Hallstein, Boston University, co-editor of Contemplating Maternity in the Era of Choice

Rebecca Jo Plant, University of California, San Diego, author of Mom: The Transformation of Motherhood in Modern America

Stephanie Shaw, Ohio State University, author of Grandmothers, Granny Women, and Old Aunts: Rethinking Slave Families and Communities in the Nineteenth-Century South

Wanda Thomas Bernard, Dalhousie University, co-author of Race and Well-Being: The Lives, Hopes and Activism of African Canadians

Shari Thurer, Boston University, author of The Myths of Motherhood

Lauri Umansky, Suffolk University, author of Impossible to Hold: Women and Culture in the 1960s

Jodi Vandenberg-Daves, University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse, author of Woman's "One Vocation": The Making of Modern Motherhood in the United States

If you are interested in being considered as a presenter, please send a 250 word abstract and a 50-word bio by September 15th, 2011 to info@motherhoodinitiative.org


** TO SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT FOR THIS CONFERENCE, ONE MUST BE A MEMBER OF MIRCI

http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org/membership.html

REMINDER #3: CALL FOR PAPERS

Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI)

The editorial board is seeking submissions for Vol. 3.1 of the Journal of the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (JMI) to be published in spring/summer 2012.

Mothers and the Economy: The Economics of Mothering

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: NOVEMBER 1, 2011!

The journal will explore the topic of Mothers and the Economy from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. We welcome submissions from scholars, students, activists, government agencies and workers, artists, mothers, and others who work or research in this area. Cross-cultural, historical and comparative work is encouraged. We also welcome creative reflections such as poetry, short stories, and artwork on the subject.

Topics can include (but are not limited to):

the economics of maintaining sustainable family systems; mothering, appropriate technology and economics; mothering and microcredit; mothering and economic activism; mothering and economic activism through the arts; mothering with reduced resources; social and economic supports for mothering; mothering within the neoliberal context; motherwork and valuation of motherwork, mothering and the economics of unpaid labour; mothers-as-providers, mother-led cooperatives; the effects of privatization/commodification on women; mothering and the economics of raising children with disabilities; the economics of maternal mortality rates; the "selling" of mothering and the economics of consumerism; consumption and the marketing of mothering; the economics of reproductive technologies and surrogacy; structural adjustment policies and mothering; the financial implications for mothers of family law reforms and welfare state developments, the economic impacts of environmental degradation on mothering; quantifications of mothering/caregiving/parenting as a part of the base structure of the economic productivity of society; children as economic assets/burdens; the actual value of domestic/unpaid labour; motherhood and the gender pay gap, mothering and the feminization of poverty; mothering, occupational segregation and the wage gap; the impacts of economic globalization on mothering and kinship networks; the envisioning and articulation of more human-centered economic systems and policies to enhance mothering/caregiving practices; transformations of male breadwinner-female caretaker models; the economics of caregiving/parenting in nontraditional households; mothering and the "new home economics"; mothering, feminist economics and social justice; mothering and welfare policies; mothering and health care costs; the commodification of domestic labour; global and transnational motherhood, transnational families in the new global economy; the economics of the second shift; global care chains; mothering/caregiving/parenting and economic justice, motherwork in organisations; mothers' economic transactions; mothers' labour paid and unpaid; mothers in enterprise and mothers in alternative enterprise; mothers and non-monetary economic flows; mothers in the workplace; homeschooling mothers; mothers as consumers; mothers and Marxism; mothers and neo-liberalism; mothers in a capitalist economy; mothers in a diverse economy; mothers and food economies; mother's milk and breastfeeding; the economic roles of mothers in undeveloped economies; the economic roles of mothers in non-Western cultures; mothering and economic subjectivity; mothers as alternative economic activists.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

Articles should be 15-18 pages (3750 words) including references.

All should be in MLA style, WordPerfect or Word and IBM compatible.

Please see our style guide for complete details:

http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org/journalsubmission.html

SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY November 1, 2011

** TO SUBMIT WORK ONE MUST BE A MEMBER OF MIRCI

http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org/membership.html

29 August 2011

A Reminder of Two Mothering CFP Deadlines Approaching!

1] Mother of Invention: How Our Mothers Influenced us as Feminist Academics and Activists [Full CFP]

Co-editors: Vanessa Reimer and Sarah Sahagian

Publication Date: 2014

This anthology will bring together essays from feminist activists and academics alike. The goal of this anthology is to act as an antidote to matrophobia and mother-blaming by bringing together a variety of feminist narratives about how our mothers, intentionally or not, have influenced and inspired our feminist work and identities. The purpose of this book is to show mothers as a productive force in their children’s development. While not exclusively a celebration, this anthology will affirm mother work's importance.

Submission Guidelines:
Abstracts: 250 Words. Please include a brief biography (50 words) (and include citizenship information)

Please send submissions to both Sarah.Sahagian@gmail.com and vreim018@yorku.ca
Subject Line: Mother of Invention Abstract

Deadline for Abstracts is September 15, 2011

2] Other Mothers/Other Mothering [Full CFP]

Editor: Angelita Reyes Publication Date: 2013

Other mothers and other mothering roles may be found throughout history and across diverse cultures. Other mothers may be the paradigmatic first responders, the first-teachers of informal and formal learnings, or first care-givers for the formative triage years of children and youth. Other mothering denotes the continuity and contemporary practices of shared, communal, or assumed mothering responsibilities that are empowering and inclusive of social transformation. Despite the prevalence of this practice and increasing scholarship about other mothering, an edited collection on this important and central cultural paradigm does not yet exist. The aim of the present collection is to investigate the history, possibilities, differences, continuities, transformations, or advancements of other mothering, paying particular attention to liberating potentials of destabilizing patriarchal representations of motherhood and family structures. As interconnected and transnational cultures are in full swing into the 21st century, both men and women can perform and enable diverse and holistic roles of other mothering. How does other mothering transform the language implications of gender? How do we interrogate the roles of mothering for both women and men? This collection will explore the fluid, empowering and diversified roles of other mothering across cultures. Thus, of particular interest are submissions that interrogate other mothering from global perspectives, comparative ethnicities and historical contexts. The editor of this collection seeks article-length contributions in the humanities, cultural studies and social sciences that may include, but are not limited to the following topics:

Submission guidelines:
Abstracts should be 250 words. Please also include a CV.
Deadline for abstracts: October 12, 2011

28 August 2011

NEW! CFP: DISABLED MOTHERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Demeter Press is seeking submissions for an edited collection on

DISABLED MOTHERS*

Co-editors: Gloria Filax and Dena Taylor

                           Publication Date: 2014

                      DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: DECEMBER 31, 2011!

While there are several books on raising children with disabilities, the literature is scant on experiences of disabled women who are raising children OR the experiences of those parented by a woman with disabilities. Bringing together disability with mothering has the potential to challenge dominant narratives of both mothering AND disability. Noticing dominant ideas, meanings, and/or stories/narratives (normative discourses) regarding both 'mothering' and 'disability' expose the limits beyond which disabled mothers live their daily lives.

The goal of this edited collection is to add to literatures on mothering and disability through providing stories by disabled mothers or their children as well as chapters of scholarly research and theorizing. We intend that both stories and research in this collection will raise critical questions about the social and cultural meanings of disability and mothering. Whether a birth mother, an adoptive mother,a foster mother, a co-mother, someone mothered by a disabled woman, or someone whose research explores disabled mothering, we invite you to submit to this collection.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

How are disabled women discouraged from having children? How does the medical model of disability shape the meanings assigned to disabled mothers? How do chronic illnesses affect mothering? Are disabled mothers healthy mothers? How do the social and cultural models of disability shape how we understand disabled mothers and mothering? Are disabled mothers oppressed? How doissues of race,class, and sexuality affect disabled mothers and their families? Should disabled mothers 'pass' as normal? How are pregnancy and birth experiences shaped by disability? How do children experience and understand a disabled mother? What support is needed and received by disabled mothers? How does the built environment, both public and private, shape the experiences of disabled mothers? What kinds of issues are there with children's schools, health professionals and/or children's attitudes? What form, if any, does social and political activism take? Do legal remedies work to assist disabled mothers (for example, disability as a protected category in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms or the Americans with Disabilities Act)? How does a mother's disability expose the expectations of mothering? How does a mother's disability expose the assumptions about disability? How is society disabling of mothering? How can we 'do' disabled mothering differently?


Submission Guidelines

Abstracts should be 250 words. Please also include a brief biography (50 words) with citizenship.

Please send to gfilax@shaw.ca and detaylor@cabrillo.edu

Deadline for Abstracts is December 31, 2011

Accepted papers of 4000-5000 words (15-20 pages) will be due October 15, 2012 and should conform to MLA citation format.

*Tanya Titchkosky argues that referring to "disabled people" is preferable because it emphasizes disablement as a social process that prevents certain people from access to resources and goods available to others. "People with disabilities" implies that disability is not part of what it is to be a person and leaves disability as a problem. We agree with Titchkosky and therefore our choice of the title for this collection is "Disabled Mothers". (See Tanya Titchkosky (2003) Disability, Self, and Society. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, chapter 2).


DEMETER PRESS
140 Holland St. West, PO Box 13022
Bradford, ON, L3Z 2Y5 (tel) 905-775-5215
http://www.demeterpress.org info@demeterpress.org

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